List of Barry’s War Dead – October 1917

A copy of the below list can be downloaded by pressing the button to the right

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

October 1917


The Third Battle of Ypres continued in the mud of Flanders with the Battle of Broodseinde (started 4th October), the Battle of Poelcapelle (started 9th October), the First Battle of Passchendaele (started 12th October) and the Second Battle of Passchendaele (26th October – 10th  November).

Gunner Bert Mason of the 151st Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action on the 2nd October, 1917.
He was buried in The Huts Cemetery, near Ypres in Belgium.

Aged 24, he was the son of Thomas and H E Mason, of 92, Graving Dock Street, Barry Dock. He was born in Cardiff and prior to enlisting had worked as a hairdresser in Maesteg. He had been a choir boy at St. Mary's Church, Barry Docks, and was educated at Holton Road Council School.
He had served in the Glamorgan Fortress Territorial Force Siege Battery for eight years.

 
Ordinary Seaman Ernest Albert Blythe, of the SS Mersario, Mercantile Marine drowned on the 1st October 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. He is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London. Aged 17, he was the son of Sidney Arthur and Rose Blythe, of 54, Archibald St., Newport, Mon.  

                           
The Mersario was a turret ship built by Doxford’s in 1906. She was registered in Glasgow. She sailed from Barry on 16th September, 1917, under Admiralty orders, carrying coal and coke to Alexandria, according to the report into her loss. At around 11:15am on 1st October she was off the Moroccan coast (at 35.40N, 7.38W, to be precise) zigzagging eastwards at around 8 knots.
She was struck by single torpedo on the starboard side "about cross bunkers". One seaman, Mohammed Hagar (aged 20) was killed by the force of the explosion. The ship went down in under three minutes, according to the report, turning turtle as she went. She took with her Ernest Albert Blythe, 18, from Newport (Monmouthshire) and William Timothy Gwynne Jones, 22, from Pennant in Cardiganshire. The U-39 surfaced and hauled the third engineer (R Chadwick from Wrexham) on board for questioning. The crew of the submarine were described as young and clean shaven but dirty-looking and spoke very good English. After confirming the name of the vessel, her cargo and the destination (which he didn’t know), the Third engineer was put on some wreckage and was subsequently picked up by the rest of the crew in one of the Mersario’s lifeboats. They were in the lifeboat overnight and were picked up early the following morning by the French steamer "La Somme" which took them to Gibraltar. The crew then made their way back to Britain when space was available on other vessels.

 Sailor Ronald George Baxter, of the SS Nuceria, Mercantile Marine drowned on the 2nd October, 1917, as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. He is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.  Aged 19, he was born in Cardiff, the son of George Hayward and Alice Baxter, of 14 Main Street, Cadoxton, Barry. On October 2nd 1917, Nuceria, on a voyage from Barry to Italy with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine U-39 (Walter Forstmann), 120 miles W1/2N from Cap Spartel. Two persons were lost.

Company Sergeant Major Joseph Simmonds (No.18082) of the 205th Company of the Machine Gun Corps (Formerly 11467, Worcester Regiment) was killed in action on the 3rd October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Aged 29, he was born in Cadoxton, the son of David and Jane Simmonds, of Sydenham Street, Barry Dock, Cardiff; husband of Ivy Madge Simmonds, of 9, Larkhall Terrace, Bath. He had been mentioned in Despatches for valuable services. In 1911 he was serving with the 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, Shaft Barracks, Western Heights, Dover.

 Private Harry Jarrett Littlehales (No.307522) of the 1st/8th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 4th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Born in Penarth, he was the younger son of the late William and Mrs. Ellen Hannay of 22, Holton Road, Barry. Prior to enlistment he was working for Messrs. Frazers, ships chandlers of Barry Docks.

On October 5th, 1917, SS Forestmoor, on a voyage from Huelva to Dublin with a cargo of copper ore, was sunk by the German submarine UB-51 (Ernst Krafft), 54 miles WxN3/4N Cape Spartel. 22 persons were lost including two men from Barry:

Sailor Thomas Jeremiah Haley, Mercantile Marine. Aged 20, the son of the late Michael and Annie Haley. Born at Barry.

Boatswain Charles Henry Williams, Boatswain, Mercantile Marine. Aged 31, he was the son of the late Charles Walter and Alice Williams; husband of Mary Annie Williams (nee Hunt), of 4, Station Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Belfast.

Lance Corporal Charles Edward Brooks (40610) of the 7th Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, died of wounds received in action on the 4th October at No.4 Casualty Clearing Station on the 8th October, 1917, and was buried in nearby Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. Born in Malmesbury, Wiltshire, he was the eldest son of Albert Edward and Adelaide Mary Brooks of Sunnydale Villa, Fairwater Grove, Cardiff. He was educated in Holton Road Council School, and on leaving school was employed by the Barry Railway Company as a booking clerk at the Barry Island Station. He enlisted on 22nd June, 1916. His commanding officer Captain J.D. Lindner wrote:

“As I daresay you know, practically ever since he came to this battalion your son has been my company clerk, so that I came personally into contact with him a good deal, and I can assure you from a personal point of view, I feel his loss very keenly. He was very quick picking up his work, and whether back in rest or up the line he always did his job well, and I had absolute trust in him. On the day he was wounded he had insisted on going up with the front line of the attack, though his duties as clerk would I the ordinary way have kept him somewhat in rear”.

https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/lifestory/522463

Private Richard William Thomas (44866) of the 75th Company Labour Corps (formerly the King’s Liverpool Regiment, 10th Labour Company) was killed on the 9th September, 1917 and is buried in Hagle Dump Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium. Aged 30, he was married to Cornelia Emmeline Thomas, of 53, Clodien Avenue, Heath, Cardiff. He was born at Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan.  The Barry Dock News reported on 2nd November that:

“Private R. W. Thomas, of the Labour Battalion, formerly of Oban Street, Cadoxton, Barry, was killed by a German shell on October 9th (sic), whilst engaged in unloading British shells in France. His widow now lives in Cardiff.”  

Private Charles Barclay John of the 1st/6th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, died of wounds on the 9th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. The Barry Dock News reported on October 26th 1917:










FORMER BARRY BUTCHER DIED OF WOUNDS.

“News reached his young wife on Sunday morning last, that Private Charles B. John, of the 1/6 Gloucester Regiment, had died of wounds received in action. Private John was in charge of a machine gun section, and was shot by a German sniper. He enlisted in September, 1915, and had been in France since March last. Before enlisting he was in the employ of Mr. B. Jeremiah, butcher, of Cadoxton, Barry, and was well-known and respected.

He was 25 years of age, and his wife (Elizabeth) and child (the latter of whom he had not seen), resided at 7, Chilcote Street, Cadoxton, Barry. Writing to his wife, one of his comrades, Private F. Barnes, stated that: "all the men in the Company miss him, and he was buried by his friends.””

 Private George Bracey (307513) of the 2nd/8th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers was killed in action on the 9th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Aged 21, he was the son of Mrs. Emma Bracey, of 22, Bell Street, Barry, Glamorgan.

 Private Thomas Edward Dunn (42091) of the 7th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment was killed action on the 12th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Aged 39, he was the husband of Mrs Alice M. Dunn of 28, Evelyn Street, Barry Dock. Before enlisting he was a partner in Giddings and Dunn, ironmongers and house furnishers, Holton Road.

Private Frederick Lewis Whittington (35524) of the 8th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on the 12th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. He attested in November 1915, and was mobilised in October 1916 initially serving in the Inland Water Transport Section, Royal Engineers, before transferring to the East Surrey Battalion in 1917. Aged 26, he was the son of Frederick and Ellen Whittington, of 52, Salop Street, Penarth; and husband of Louisa Eleanor Whittington, of 6, Machen Street, Penarth, Glamorgan. He was born in Cadoxton in 1890, and in 1911 was living 12, Ivy Place, Penarth.

Private Thomas William Healey (1835), of the 34th Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces was killed in action on the 12th October 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Aged 25, he was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Healey of 36, Commercial Road, Cadoxton, and husband of Enid Elizabeth Healey, 45 Jewel Street, Barry Docks (previously 34 Newlands Street, Barry). He was working as a waiter in Australia when he enlisted on the 28th April, 1916, and after training disembarked in France on 21st November, 1916.
Suffering with Trench Feet, he was transferred to England on the 12th December, 1916. After treatment, He rejoined his unit in France on 31st August, 1917, and was initially reported missing in action, later killed on 12th October, 1917.

Gunner Robert Brooks (W/881) of “C” Battery, 121st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds at the 57th Field Ambulance on the 13th October, 1917 and was buried in Voormezeele Enclosures No.1 and No.2. He was born in Barry and was the husband of Evelyn Brooks. On the 13th October, 1917 when on route from Belfast for Barry, SS Eskmere was torpedoed by German submarine UC-75 and sunk when 15 miles West North West from South Stack, Anglesey, Wales. Twenty lives were lost including the Master and three men from Barry:

 Chief Steward William Maxwell, Mercantile Marine. Aged 59, the son of the late William Maxwell; husband of Eliza Ann Maxwell (nee Rich), of 36, Fryatt Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Glasgow;

Assistant Steward Francis Morris Grey (Served as Osborne)., Mercantile Marine. Aged 15, son of Elizabeth Philp (formerly Grey), of 36, Fryatt St., Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Cardiff; Sailor William Frederick Smith, Mercantile Marine. Aged 19, son of Frederick and Jane Smith (nee Thomas), of 46, Sydenham Street, Barry.

Sergeant Edward Boyle (348060) of the 113th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action on the 15th October, 1917. He is buried in Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium. He was the husband of Evelyn Boyle, 2, George Street, Barry Docks. Born in Grangetown, Cardiff, Sergeant Boyle was well known in boxing circles, and before joining the Forces was employed by the Penarth Pontoon Company. On October 18th, 1917, SS Sten, on a voyage from Barry to Saint Malo with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine UC-64 (Erich Hecht), 5 miles north of Godrevy lighthouse. Nine persons were lost including two Barry men:

Sailor George Gill, Mercantile Marine.

Aged 24, he was the son of Cleaphas and Elizabeth Alice Gill; husband of Mary Jane Gill (nee Fifield), of 3, Quarella Street, Cadoxton, Barry. Born at Ystrad, Rhondda.

 

Sailor Evan Owens, Mercantile Marine.

Aged 19, he was the son of John and Ida Annie Owens, of 62, Station Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Bryngwran, Anglesey. On October 19th, 1917, the Australian government steamship Australdale with a cargo of coal from Wales to Gibraltar was sailing in convoy when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine U-22. The attack occurred off the north west coast of Spain in the Bay of Biscay. Three boats got away, of which the lifeboat with twenty-seven men was never heard of again. The other boats managed to make a landing in France, but two men died while the boats were adrift. Two Barry men were on board and lost their lives:

 Trimmer Samuel Robert Bubbins, Mercantile Marine.

Aged 16, he was the son of Samuel Bubbins, of 74, Graving Dock Street, Barry Dock, and the late Mary Ann Bubbins (nee Jones). He died from exposure a few hours before the lifeboat containing himself and ten other men, one of whom was also dead, was picked up by a fishing smack and landed in a French port. The other life-boat, containing 24 of the crew, was not found.

Boy Edward Powell, Mercantile Marine, also died on the 26th October. Aged 16, the son of Edward and Eleanor Powell, of 26, Travis Steeet, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Neath, Glamorgan.

 

Private Albert Edward Mundy (59843) of the 37th Casualty Clearing Station, Royal Army Medical Corps, died on the 20th October, 1917 as a result of an air raid. He was buried in Godewaersvelde British Cemetery. Born in Barry in 1897 he was the son of Mr. Frank and Mrs. Elizabeth Mundy, of 28, Jewell Street, Barry Dock. In 1911 he was living at 4, Lower Morel Street, Barry Dock with his parents. He enlisted in Barry and had arrived in France on the 18th November, 1915.


Driver William Evan Kent (54071), “B” Battery, 58th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds at No.3 Canadian General Hospital, France on 20th October, 1917, and was buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery. Aged 18, he was the son of Evan and Annie Kent, of 552, Cowbridge Road, Canton, Cardiff, late of St. Nicholas, Cardiff.

It was reported in the Barry Dock News that Gunner Kent was in hospital with wounds and gas poisoning received in action at Poelcappelle. He had joined the R.F.A. on 23rd November, 1914, served in Gallipoli from April 1915; took part in the landing there and in the evacuation in January 1916 during which he was nearly drowned by being capsized into the sea; then proceeded to Egypt; was drafted to France in June 1916 after having been in hospital for some time suffering from trench sores and septic poisoning. A later message stated that Gunner Kent had succumbed to his wounds on Saturday, 20th October.

 

Gunner William Albert Best (348355) of the 329th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died of wounds on 23rd October, 1917 and is buried in Lijssenthoek  Military Cemetery.
Aged 19, he was the son of Mr. George H. and Mrs. Elizabeth Best, late of 33, Tynewydd Road, Barry Docks, now of Woodfield, Sully. He enlisted on July 29th, 1915, and proceeded to France in April 1917. His major described him as” a good and brave soldier, and his death is a great loss to the Battery." Formerly a scholar of Gladstone Road School, and member of St. Mary's Church Choir.

When off Ushant on 23rd October, 1917 the Tredegar Hall survived a torpedo attack, which missed, and she held her own in an exchange of gunfire from the same German U-boat. She was finally torpedoed without warning by UB-57 at 6.40 a.m. and hit in the engine room on the port side. The vessel sank quickly with the loss of three lives including the Second Engineer, Ivor George John Sparks, Mercantile Marine. Aged 24, he was the son of John and Elizabeth Sparks (nee Allen), of Lyndhurst, Friar's Road, Barry Island.The Chief Officer and twenty-four crew took to the starboard lifeboat, the Master and remaining crew attempted to launch the dinghy but the ship sank before it could be lowered. They were now forced jump into the water, one donkeyman was drown after jumping overboard, they were picked up 40 minutes later by the other lifeboat. Eventually a Minesweeper came on the scene and picked up all the survivors and landed them at Grimsby.

 

Rifleman William Davies (R/2728) of the 17th Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps was killed in action on the 24th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Aged 24, he was the son of Mr. David Davies of 142, Woodlands Rd., Barry Dock, Barry. Private Davies was born in Barry and was a member of the Tabernacle Congregational Church, Barry Dock.

Lance Corporal Henry George Hicks (37677) of the 9th Battalion of the Welsh Regiment died on the 24th October 1917 and was buried in Barry (Merthyr Dyfan) Cemetery.
He was the son of Frederick and Melinda Hicks, of Treharne Road, Barry; husband of Florence Cummings (formerly Hicks), of 4, Fairford Street, Barry, later Twynyrodyn, Wenvoe, Cardiff.
He joined the Welsh Regiment on the 19th May, 1915, and was posted firstly to the 3rd Battalion in May 1915, and was then posted overseas on the 16th December, 1915 with the 9th Battalion.
He was wounded in his right foot by shell fire on the 7th July, 1916, and was hospitalised in Manchester. After treatment he was posted to the 59th Training Reserve Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment on 14th July, 1917, and was serving as an instructor at Kinmel Park, North Wales where he died of heart failure on the 24th October, 1917.

 

Private John Thomas Vaughan (51507) of “C” Company, 21st Battalion, Manchester Regiment was killed in action on the 24th October, 1917. He has no known grave and thus, is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. Aged 20, he was the son of the late J. H. and Maria Vaughan, of 33, Cross Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan.


On October 28th, 1917, SS Redesmere, on a voyage from Barry to Southampton with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine UB-40 (Hans Howaldt), 6 miles West South West of St. Catherine's Point. 19 persons were lost, including one Barry man: Mess Room Steward Robert Fraser Campbell, Mercantile Marine.Aged 19, he was the son of Alexander and Marion Campbell, of 87, Court Road, Barry.

 

Sapper George Rendall (181662) of the Railway Operating Division, Royal Engineers, died of wounds on the 29th October, 1917, and was buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Aged 29, he was the husband of Emily Rendell, of 58, Church Road, Cadoxton, Barry. Before enlisting he worked at the Biglis Pumping Station.

 

Private Frank Yeandle (43711) of the 24th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, was killed in action on the 31st October, 1917 in Palestine, and was buried in Beersheba War Cemetery. Born in 1898, he was the son of Joseph and Julia Yeandle. Prior to his enlistment in 1915 he was living with his brother at 19, Wenvoe Terrace, Barry and worked for C.H. Burnett, Butchers of Barry.

Lest We Forget - Is a full comprehensive list of the soldiers from the Barry area that were lost during the great war. The list is broken down into casualites per month. The list can either be accessed via the table below or on the menu above, by hovering over the Lest We Forget button and selecting the appropriate month. A copy of the list is also available from the button at the top right of the page.