Lest We Forget - Is a full comprehensive list of the soldiers from the Barry area that were lost during the great war. The list is broken down into casualites per month. The list can either be accessed via the table below or on the menu above, by hovering over the Lest We Forget button and selecting the appropriate month. A copy of the list is also available from the button at the top right of the page.

List of Barry’s War Dead – May 1917

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

A copy of the below list can be downloaded by pressing the button to the right


May 1917

 

Private Albert Paulding of the 8th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps was killed in action near Bullecourt on 3rd May, 1917. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France. At the outbreak of hostilities, he had joined the King’s Royal Rifles, and had been in many engagements, being gassed in the Somme offensive. Aged 21, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Paulding of 61 Station Street, Barry Dock. He was a former pupil of Romilly School and prior to enlisting was employed in the locomotive department of the Barry Railway Company.

 

Private Edward Halloran of the 5th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was killed in action on the 3rd May, 1917. He had been awarded the Military medal for bravery in the field in France in the London Gazette of 9th December, 1916. This award is believed for actions between September and October on the Somme. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France. He was born and enlisted in Barry. His personal effects were sent to his sister, Mrs Mary A. Shiers and his brothers Frederick and William. 

 

Lieutenant Frank C. James of the 1st Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment died of wounds on the 4th May, 1917 whilst a prisoner of war. Initially reported wounded and missing on the 3rd May, it was later confirmed he had been captured by the Germans on the 3rd May and died of his wounds whilst a prisoner on the 4th May. He is buried in the Douai Communal Cemetery, France. Aged 19, he was the youngest son of the late Rev. H. P. James and Mrs. M. A. James of 41, St. Nicholas Road, Barry.

Gunner John Wilson of B Battery, 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery died of wounds on the 4th May, 1917 and is buried in Bray Military Cemetery. Aged 19, he was the husband of Lydia Maud Wilson of 20, Arthur Street, Cadoxton, Barry.

 

Private Herbert Davey of the 7th Battalion of the Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment died of gunshot wounds in the 55th Field Ambulance on the 6th May, 1917 and is buried in Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, France. In 1915, he had joined the Welsh Horse with his three brothers, but all were later transferred into other units. Aged 20, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Davey, of 31, Treharne Road, Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan.

 

Private Oswald Seton Hullin of the Royal Canadian Regiment, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action by shellfire whilst in trenches in the vicinity of Vimy on Sunday the 13th May, 1917. He is buried in the Bois Carre Cemetery, Thelus, 4 miles NNE of Arras.

His officer wrote:

“Private Hullin was a splendid soldier, and more than liked by the whole company. He died a soldier’s death, doing his duty. May the memory of his bravery sustain and strengthen you.”

He went to Canada in 1913, and enlisted on the outbreak of war. He saw a great deal of fighting, being in a bombing section.Aged 26, he was the only surviving son of the late Mr. Edwin Hullin of Dinas Powis, formerly of Barry, and the brother of Miss Annie Hullin whose address was given in his papers as Buckingham Palace.
 

First Engineer James Bryce Oswald of the SS Kilmaho, Mercantile Marine, died on the 17th May, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. Aged 66, he was the son of John and Christina Oswald; husband of Mary Agnes Oswald (nee O'sullivan), of 3, Wayside Cottage, Eastbrook, Dinas Powis, Glamorgan.
 

Messroom Steward Sidney Patrick Oswald of the SS Kilmaho, Mercantile Marine, died on the 17th May, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. The SS Kilmaho was lost travelling between Cardiff and Dunkirk. She was sunk by the German submarine UB 20 west of the Lizard. The only survivor of the 21-man crew was an Arab fireman who was taken from the water alive 6 hours after the incident. The body of another crew member was also recovered. Aged 17, he was the son of Mary Agnes Oswald (nee O'Sullivan), of 3, Wayside Cottage, Eastbrook, Dinas Powis, Glamorgan, and the late James Bryce Oswald. He was born in Penarth.
 

Messroom Steward William James Welch of the SS Mordenwood, Mercantile Marine, died on 18th May, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.
The Mordenwood was sunk by the German submarine U-29 (Leo Prasil). Her position when torpedoed was in the Mediterranean 90 miles SExS1/2S of Cape Matapan. There were 21 casualties. Aged 22, he was the son of Ada Assman, (formerly Welch), of 32, Barry Road, Barry Dock, Glamorgan, and the late Charles Welch.
 

Messroom Steward Albert Benjamin Vincent of the SS Mary Baird, Mercantile Marine, died on the 18th May, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.
On May 18th, 1917, Mary Baird on a voyage from Rouen to Newport in ballast, was sunk by a mine from the German submarine UC-47 (Paul Hundius), 2.5 miles W1/2N from Pendeen Cove. Seven persons were lost. Aged 17, he was the son of George and Elizabeth Vincent, of 42, Tydfil Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. He was born at Llandaff, Cardiff.













Lieutenant Ivor John Clarke of the 28th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was killed in action at Vimy on 20th May, 1917 and is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery, Mont-St Eloi, five miles North West of Arras. Aged 24, he was the son of Uriah Barwell Clarke, of 61, Trinity Street, Barry, South Wales. In 1915, he was residing in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, where he worked as an electrician. He sailed from Halifax on the SS Olympic leaving for the UK on 12th October, 1916.

 

Fireman Samuel Ashton Cartwright of the SS Porthkerry, Mercantile Marine, died on 20th May, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. The SS Porthkerry, a 1,920 ton 280ft steamer was torpedoed on the 20th May, 1917 by UB-40, 16 miles west by south from Beachy Head, English Channel. The Captain and seven crew were killed.

The Porthkerry had stopped to pick up survivors and was torpedoed by the same U-Boat that sank the SS Tycho seven minutes earlier. Fifteen men and the master of the Tycho were killed. When about 8 miles south of Beachy Head on the 20th May, the British steamer Tycho was torpedoed without warning and began to go down by the head. The ship was abandoned, the crew taking to the boats. The crew then rowed towards the steamship Porthkerry which had seen the explosion and was standing by about 200 yards away on the port beam to pick up any survivors. As the boats came alongside Porthkerry, another torpedo was discharged by the submarine. This blew up one of the boats, killing the master and 14 men, and capsizing the other boat. The Porthkerry was abandoned, with eight casualties, the vessel going down in three minutes after being struck by the torpedo. Survivors from both ships were picked up at seven o'clock that night by a small coasting steamer and landed at Newhaven at midnight on the 21st May.

Aged 24, he was the Son of Samuel and Lily Cartwright; husband of Beatrice Maud Cartwright (nee Griffiths), of 93, Merthyr Street, Barry, Glamorgan. He was born at Cadoxton, Barry.

 

Gunner Martin Leonard Albert James of the 223rd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on 21st May, 1917 and is buried in Athies Communal Cemetery Extension, France. He enlisted in Barry and left a widow, Margaret James and children.

 

Sergeant William Harris of the 49th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in action by shell fire on 23rd May, 1917 and is buried in La Targette British Cemetery, Neuville-St,Vaast. Sergeant Harris had been in France from the commencement of the war, and was a reservist. Information of his death was given in a letter sent to his relatives at home by Sergeant Edgar Leaman, Royal Garrison Artillery, also of Barry Docks. Aged 30, he was the son of Mr and Mrs Henry Harris of 97, Dock View Road, Barry Dock. His family home was at 47, Castleland Street, Barry Docks. He left a widow and one child. He was previously employed as a coal tipper at Barry Docks.

 

Private George Arnold Connelly of “C” Company, 11th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry was killed in action on the 25th May, 1917. He is buried in Vraucourt Copse Cemetery, Vaulx-Vraucourt, France. Aged 31, he was the son of Thomas and Alice Violet Connelly of “St. Georges”, Wenvoe Terrace, Barry.