Lest We Forget - Is a full comprehensive list of the soldiers from the Barry area that were lost during the great war. The list is broken down into casualites per month. The list can either be accessed via the table below or on the menu above, by hovering over the Lest We Forget button and selecting the appropriate month. A copy of the list is also available from the button at the top right of the page.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

List of Barry’s War Dead – July 1917

A copy of the below list can be downloaded by pressing the button to the right

July 1917

The 31st July, 1917 saw the start of a major battle known officially as the Third Battle of Ypres, but more commonly as Passchendaele. It was to last until 10th November, 1917. At the end of the first day significant advances had been made, the 38th (Welsh) Division did particularly well and was singled out for praise by Field Marshal Haig. Unfortunately, heavy rain then fell in torrents, the worst weather in Belgium for many years turned the battlefield into a muddy quagmire, which was to be the most memorable feature of the battlefield, with attacking troops struggling to make progress in the mud.

 

Second Engineer David Oliver Davies of the SS Southina, Mercantile Marine, died on the 7th July, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.   On 7th July, 1917, the SS Southina, on a voyage from Cardiff to Oran with a cargo of coal and government stores, was sunk by the German submarine UC-67 (Karl Neumann), 6 miles West North West of Cap Sigli, Algeria. One person was lost. Aged 37, he was the son of Samuel and Hannah Davies; husband of Margaret Mary Davies (nee Roberts), of 8, Welford Street, Barry, Glamorgan. He was born at Maesteg.
 

Private George Henry Northcott of 901st Mechanical Transport, Army Service Corps, died of heart disease on 7th July, 1917. He is buried in Basra War Cemetery, Iraq. Aged 27, the son of William and Elizabeth Jane Northcott, of Melrose, Sully and husband of Mary Elizabeth Northcott. He was educated in Dinas Powis County Schools; he was a motor mechanic. He enlisted in the Army Service Corps on 15th March, 1916 and served with the Indian Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia from 2nd March, 1917.

 
Mess Room Steward Sidney John Dench of the SS Calliope, Mercantile Marine, died on the 12th July, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.
On 12th July, 1917, SS Calliope, on voyage from Seville to Newport with a cargo of iron ore, was torpedoed and sunk by German U-boat U-155 (Kapitänleutnant Karl Meusel) 150 miles North of Madeira. All 27 crew died. Aged 15, he was the son of Mrs. Florence Kate Smith, of 30, Holmes Street, Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan. He was born at Twickenham. 
 

Sapper Sydney George John of the 557th Army Troops Company, Royal Engineers, died of wounds on the 11th July, 1917. He is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium. He was born and enlisted in Barry and went to France 8th March, 1915.

 

Carpenter William Eakon of the SS Mariston, Mercantile Marine died on the 15th July, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.   Aged 52, he was the husband of Ellen Eakon (nee Saunders), of 3, Lee Road, Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan. He was born at Stettin. On 15th July, 1917, SS Mariston, a defensively armed British Merchant steamer was on a voyage from Almeria to the Clyde, Glasgow with a cargo of copper ore when 82 miles West of the Fastnet, Ireland, when she was torpedoed without warning and sunk by German submarine U-45 (Erich Sittenfeld). Twenty-eight lives were lost including the Master.

On the 16th July, 1917, SS Ribston was on route from Melilla to the Clyde with a cargo of iron ore when she was torpedoed by German submarine U-45 and sank 85 miles west from the Fastnet rock. The crew of 25 were all lost including the master and nine Barry Merchant seamen.

 

Able Seaman William Jenkin Bartlett, aged 20, son of Rachel Bartlett of 4 Clive Road Barry, Island.
 

Carpenter Zanis Constantine Coutsoudis, aged 58, son of the late Constantine and Stamaton Coutsoudis; husband of Assimio Coutsoudis, of 8, Travis Street, Barry. Born in Chile. Tower Hill Memorial.


Sailor George Mansel Durbin, aged 18, son of William Henry and Kathleen Ellen Durbin, of 13, Bassett Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Tower Hill Memorial.
 

Fireman Benjamin Charles Evans, aged 23, son of David and Elizabeth Evans, of 101, Merthyr Street, Barry, Glamorgan.

 
Fireman Joseph Kays, aged 32, son of W. Henry and Emma Kays; husband of Beatrice Kays (nee Chick), of 5, Palmerston Road, Cadoxton, Barry. Born at Bedminster, Bristol.
 

Sailor George Henry Lixton, aged 18, son of John and Mary Ann Lixton (nee Smith), of 15, Commercial Road, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Newport, Mon.
 

Able Seaman George Henry Taylor, aged 21, son of George and Lucy Ann Taylor (nee Baker), of 4, Gilbert Street, Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan. Tower Hill Memorial.
 

Fireman John Owen Charles Vincent, aged 28, son of George and Elizabeth Vincent; husband of Minnie Evelina Vincent (nee Taylor), of 40, Tydfil Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Cardiff.









 

Fireman Charles Stanley Wilson, aged 24, son of John and Emily Wilson; husband of Annie May Wilson (nee Thomas), of 60, Graving Dock Street, Barry Dock, Glamorgan. Born at Cardiff.

 

Second Lieutenant Ivor Llewellyn Dadds, Inland Water Transport, Royal Engineers, died on 17th July, 1917, he is buried in Basra War Cemetery, Iraq. Aged 30, he was the son of Samuel Llewellyn Dadds and Elizabeth Dadds of “Brynhyfryd,” Miskin Street, Barry.
 

Private William T. Hookings, Caterpillar Driver, Base Mechanical Transport Depot, Army Service Corps, died through the effects of excessive heat in Mesopotamia, on 23rd July, and was buried in Kut War Cemetery, Iraq. He had been in the Army for eighteen months, and had been in the East for the last twelve months. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Hookings, 5 Brickyard Terrace, Cadoxton, Barry. He was formerly a locomotive fireman on the Barry Railway. He was 26 years of age, educated at Cadoxton Council School, and left a wife – Florence Elizabeth and two children, having lived at Church Road, Cadoxton.

 

Ship’s Cook Thomas York of the SS Ludgate, Mercantile Marine died on the 26th July, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. On 26th July, 1917, SS Ludgate, on a voyage from Huelva to Garston with a cargo of iron ore, was sunk by a mine from the German submarine UC-51(Hans Galster), two miles south from Galley Head. Twenty-four crew were lost. Aged 51, he was the husband of Eleanor York (nee Murphy), of 26, Fryatt Street, Barry. He was born at York.

 

Gunner Thomas Sidney Bryant of “Y” Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, 38th (Welsh) Division was killed in action on the 28th July. Aged 19, he was buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Belgium.                                 

The Barry Dock News reported:

ONE OF THE VERY BEST

O.C. KILLED SEVEN DAYS AFTER RETURNING FROM LEAVE.

In a letter to Mr. and Mrs. James Bryant, 131, Dock View Road, Barry Docks, the Commanding Officer, “Y” Battery, Trench Mortar Battery, 38th Division, Royal Field Artillery, informed them of the death in action of their son, Tom S. Bryant.

In the communication, the O.C. says:

“Your son was killed by a German shell on July 28th. It is a very great blow to me, as he was my best gunner. He died a soldier's death, by his gun, but we cannot afford to lose good men, and he was one of the very best. There has been some hot fighting here lately and he did splendidly."

Gunner Bryant was home on leave on July 10th, returned to France on the 19th, and was killed on the 28th. He joined the Army when he was 17, and spent his 19th birthday in the trenches. He was formerly employed in the Barry Railway Engine Sheds. An old pupil of Hannah Street Council School, he played for the school football team, and captained Hannah Street when they won the Schools' Football Shield. His mother is a lineal descendant of Sir Henry Matthews, who fought in the Battle of Street Fagan's on the side of the Royalists.”

 

Gunner Percival Christmas Thomas of “B” Battery, 122nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds on the 29th July, 1917. He is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, the son of Caroline Thomas. He lived (in) and enlisted in Barry.

 

Second Lieutenant John Humphrey England of the 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment was killed in action on the 31st July. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to The Missing, Ypres, Belgium. He had been “Mentioned in Despatches”.

The Barry Dock News reported:

LIEUTENANT KILLED IN THE MEMORABLE PUSH

Lieutenant Jack England, who was killed whilst leading his men in the push on July 31st, was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. England, of Llanishen, and grandson of Mr. J. Jewel Williams, of Glanhafren, Barry. He was educated at Cardiff High School and King's College, Taunton, afterwards entering the service of Messrs. Spillers and Bakers.

Immediately war broke out he joined the Welsh Cyclists, and assisted for nearly twelve months in guarding the North-East Coast, he obtained his commission in August 1915, and went to the front a year later with the Welsh Regiment. Accounts to hand show that he acquitted himself with great vigour and bravery. He will be a great loss, writes the colonel. He was a fine, brave boy, and always did his work well. Your boy's company had fought their way to the final objective before he was killed.

 

Private Leslie Richard Thomas, “A” Company, 14th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, was killed in action on the 31st July. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate “Memorial to The Missing”, Ypres, Belgium. In the attack on the Pilckem Ridge on the 31st July the 14th Battalion, of the Welsh Regiment had five Officers killed, four officers wounded and 80 Other Ranks killed, and 141 Other Ranks wounded. Aged 19, the son of William and Catherine Mary Thomas of 36, Dyfan Road, Witchill Estate, Cadoxton, Barry.
 

Second Lieutenant Norman McCallum, of the 11th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders was killed in action on the 31st July. He had been in France since June, 1915, and was severely wounded in the neck at the battle of Loos. Mr. James A. McCallum, Windsor Road, Barry, was informed of the death in action of his son, Second Lieutenant Norman McCallum, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was 22 years of age, and had enlisted in September, 1914. Lieutenant McCallum was a keen sportsman and footballer, and a staunch supporter of the Barry Rowing Club. Educated at Barry County School. A brother, Graydon McCallum, of the Royal Engineers, was training for (a) commission.

 

Private Frank Wood of the 13th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, was killed in action on 31st July. He is buried in Duhallow ADS Cemetery, Belgium. Born in Barry Dock, he enlisted in Birmingham, and was married to Kate Wood with one child.

 
 Private Edward Theophilus Christie of the 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment, was killed in action on 31st July. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to The Missing, Ypres, Belgium. Born in Barry, he lived and enlisted in Hull, and was the son of Sarah A. Christie.