List of Barry’s War Dead – August 1917

Lest We Forget - Is a full comprehensive list of the soldiers from the Barry area that were lost during the great war. The list is broken down into casualites per month. The list can either be accessed via the table below or on the menu above, by hovering over the Lest We Forget button and selecting the appropriate month. A copy of the list is also available from the button at the top right of the page.

A copy of the below list can be downloaded by pressing the button to the right

August 1917

The Third Battle of Ypres continued in the mud of Flanders with the capture of Westhoek on the 10th of August, and the Battle of Langemarck 16th to 18th August, a defeat for the allies.


Private Denis Cornelius Ferrissey of the 9th Battalion, Welsh Regiment, was killed in action 1st August, 1917. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. (His name is on the St Helens War Memorial.) He served in France from 4th October, 1915.
Born in 1897, he was the son of William and the late Norah Ferrissey of 46, Harvey Street, Cadoxton, Barry.

Private Albert Coslett of the 15th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 4th August, 1917. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. His brother Private Herbert Coslett, of the Cardiff City Battalion, wrote to his mother, Mrs. Coslett, 36, Dinam Street, Barry Docks, informing her of the death of his youngest brother, Private Albert Coslett, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, in France, in the recent fighting, having been shot in the heart during a bombing attack on the German trenches by a sniper. Private Coslett, who was 19 years of age, had only been at the Front four months, this being his first battle. His brother, who had seen the grave, said that it was kept trim and tidy (sadly the grave was lost in subsequent fighting and Albert is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres). Another brother, Sergeant-Major E. R. Coslett, Royal Field Artillery, was also at the Front; whilst Sapper W. Coslett, another brother, had been discharged and invalided from the Barry Company of the Royal Engineers.

 
Private Arthur Nelson Cirell of the 12th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 3rd August, 1917. He has no known grave and is thus commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. Age 21, he was the son of Mrs. Alice Jane Stapleton, of 20, Churchill Terrace, Cadoxton, Barry, Glamorgan.

 

Lance-Corporal Walter Thomas Scott of the 11th (Service) Battalion, Rifle Brigade, was killed in action in France on 10th August, 1917. He is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium. He enlisted in September, 1914, and had served in France 25 months, having previously been wounded in September 1916. Before he enlisted he had been employed by the Barry Railway Company. Born in Newport, Monmouth in 1887, he was the son of the late Mr. Thomas Scott and of Mrs. Elizabeth George, 65, Graving Dock Street, Barry Docks.

 

Gunner Alfred Ernest Doyle, “B” Battery, 71st Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds on the 14th August, 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres. On the 7th September, the Barry Dock News reported that:

“Private Alfred Ernest Doyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Doyle, 19, Lombard Street, Barry Docks, and husband of Mrs. Doyle, 33, Brook Street, Barry Docks, has been killed in action in France, whilst serving with his regiment, the Royal Field Artillery.

Private Doyle was 30 years of age, and was employed by Messrs. J. Marshall and Co., meat purveyors, Barry Docks, for eleven years, and was latterly employed by Messrs. England and Co., potato importers. He was an old pupil of St. Helen's Roman Catholic School. (His name is on the St Helens War Memorial.) His father served through the Zulu Campaign with the 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment, and holds the Zulu medal. Private Doyle enlisted on December 12th, 1916, and was in France the following June. He leaves a widow and one child.”

 

Driver Charles Frederick Beecham of ‘B’ Battery, 122nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed action on the 14th August, 1917. He is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery, Flanders, Belgium. Born in Barry, he was the son of Harriet Beecham, he enlisted in Mountain Ash.
 

Private Arthur Champ, of the 1st/2nd Monmouthshire Regiment, youngest son of Mr. J. Champ, 17, Beatrice Road, Cadoxton, Barry, was killed in France on August 18th, by a shell as he was returning to his trench from an attack. He is buried in Artillery Wood Cemetery, Belgium. Aged 19, he had joined the 3rd Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment eighteen months earlier with his brother, Private William Champ, who served in France in the Warwickshire Regiment. He arrived in France on 14th March, 1917 and had previously been wounded on the 26th May, 1917.

 

Corporal William George Pratt of the 15th Battalion, Welsh Regiment was killed in action on the 22nd August, 1917. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

The Barry Dock News reported that:

“The War Office have informed Mrs. Pratt of 110, Porthkerry Road, Barry, that her husband, Corporal William George Pratt (22), 15th Welsh Regiment, was killed by a shell in France on August 22nd. Corporal Pratt had been with the Forces since the outbreak of war, being called up as a Territorial. He was formerly with the 7th Welsh Cyclists but was later transferred to the 15th Welsh.

He had one child, and before enlisting was a haulier in the employ of Messrs. J. Gay and Son, coal merchants, Barry Docks. He had two brothers in the Army, Sergeant Ernest Pratt serving in Egypt with the 53rd Cyclists' Division, and Signaller Thomas Pratt, Welsh Guards, who had been home on leave last week.”

 










Corporal Stanley W. Beckinsale of the 75th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on the 23rd August, 1917. He is buried in Canada Farm Cemetery. Aged 23, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Beckinsale of 34, Gaen Street, Barry.

 

Private Herbert Albert Barrett of the 45th Company of the Machine Gun Corps (formerly 49466, Welsh Regiment) was killed in action on the 23rd August, 1917. He has no known grave and thus is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Flanders, Belgium.

 

Private John Leonard Baker of the 3rd Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, died at home on the 23rd August, 1917 and is buried in Plymouth (Western Mill) Cemetery. Born on the 9th September 1898, Barry Dock, the son of Walter and Frances Baker, he had previously served as a Boy Seaman in the Royal Navy from 16 March, 1914 to 25th November, 1914 before enlisting. He had arrived in France on 26th October, 1915.

 

Donkeyman John Goddard of the SS Veghtstroom, Mercantile Marine, drowned on the 23rd August, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine. The SS Veghtstroom, on a voyage from Penarth to Havre with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine UC-47 (Paul Hundius), seven miles northwest of the Godrevy lighthouse. Five persons were lost. Aged 34, he was the son of Sarah Goddard and the late George Goddard; husband of Mabel Gertrude Goddard (nee Dyer), of 42, Arthur Street, Cadoxton, Barry. Born at Penarth.

 

Sailor Ivor Leslie Curtis of the SS Heatherside, Mercantile Marine, drowned on the 24th August, 1917 as a result of an attack by an enemy submarine.
The SS Heatherside, on a voyage from Newport via Milford Haven to Malta with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine U-93 (Helmut Gerlach), northwest from Cape Ortegal. Twenty-seven persons were lost. Aged 17, he was the son of Lionel Edgar and Emma Elizabeth Curtis (nee Benneworth), of 2, Station Street, Barry Docks, Glamorgan.  

 

Second Lieutenant Reginald Rees Jones D.S.O. of the 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards was wounded on 31st July, 1917, and died of his wounds on the 25th August, 1917. He is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium. Aged 21, he was the only Son of John B. and Elizabeth Jones, of the Cash Supply Stores, 86 High Street, Barry, Glamorgan. He had served with the British Expeditionary Force since 25th September, 1916, and had been Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his cool judgement and bravery.

The Welsh Guards history records that in the attack on 31st July encountering blockhouses for the first time:

“Second Lieutenant R. R. Jones rushed one of them, and fired a rifle through the loophole, killing the machine gunner, while his men dealt with those trying to escape from the rear. The casualties of the battalion for the day were 138, amongst them was the gallant 2nd Lieutenant R. R. Jones, mortally wounded.”

The deceased young officer was assistant scoutmaster of the 1st Barry Scouts, and had been awarded the silver wolf as a mark of efficiency whilst serving with the Scouts. He was also a member of the 1st Barry Company when they won the King's Challenge Banner. Prior to joining the Army in January 1916, Lieutenant Jones assisted his father in business, and was an old pupil of Barry County School. He was nephew of Councillor S. R. Jones Barry Docks; a member of Bethel Baptist Church, Barry, and assistant secretary of the Sunday School.

 

Private George Bellamy of the 7th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, died on 27th August, 1917, of wounds received in action 15th August at Langemarck. He is buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, France. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Bellamy, 34, Davies Street, Cadoxton. Before enlisting, Private Bellamy was a platelayer on the Barry Railway, where he had been employed for twenty years. A brother, Private James Bellamy, Welsh Pioneer Regiment, was serving in India.

 

Private William Herbert Harry of the 1st Battalion, Monmouthshire Regiment (11th Battalion South Wales Borderers) was killed in action on the 27th August, 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France. Aged 20, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham William Harry, of Trehill, St. Nicholas, Cardiff. Private Harry was for four years booking clerk at Barry Railway Station, and was living at 37, High Street, Barry when he enlisted.

 

Rifleman William James Surridge of the 9th Battalion, the Rifle Brigade died of wounds on 30th August, 1917, and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France. He had been evacuated back to the military base at Etaples for treatment, having been wounded in the fighting around Langemarck during the Battle of Passchendaele.
Aged 20, he was the son of Ernest and Lucy Surridge of 56, Castle Street, Barry and before the war he was working for Barry Railway at the cleaning sheds.

 

Sergeant Frederick Hunt of ‘A’ Coy 1/5th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, died on 31st August, 1917 and is buried in Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No.3, Flanders, Belgium. Aged 32, he was the husband of Marian Alice Hunt, of 27, Plymouth Road, Barry Island, Glamorgan.
 

Private Reginald Hookings of the 114th Company, Machine Gun Corps, formerly South Wales Borderers, died of wounds on the 31st August, 1917 and is buried at Bard Cottage Cemetery,Belgium. Aged 24, he was the son of Jack and Eliza Hookings, of 3, Fore Street, Beer, Devon; husband of Caroline Elizabeth Bubbins (formerly Hookings), of 51, Vale Street, Barry, Glamorgan.

 

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.